Tesla’s recently launched Model 3 with a “Mid-Range” battery pack received an official EPA rating of 123 MPGe (combined), 128 for city driving and 117 for highway driving.

The Mid-Range battery pack’s EPA rating slots it in the second position, behind Tesla Model 3 Rear Wheel Drive Long Range Model, but ahead of the two All-Wheel Drive Models, Model 3 AWD and Model 3 AWD Performance.

Tesla’s cheapest sedan also has better EPA rating than GM’s Chevrolet Bolt which offers 119 MPGe (combined), 128 for city driving and 110 for highway driving.

EPA Fuel Economy

  1. Tesla Model 3 Long Range            – 26 kWh/100 mi

  2. Tesla Model 3 Mid Range              – 27 kWh/100 mi

  3. Chevrolet Bolt EV                          – 28 kWh/100 mi

  4. Tesla Model 3 AWD                       – 29 kWh/100 mi

  5. Tesla Model 3 AWD Performance – 29 kWh/100 mi

Tesla Model 3 Mid Range EPA Fuel Economy Comparison with other Models
Tesla Model 3 Mid Range EPA Fuel Economy Comparison with other Models

The Mid-Range model 3 offers only 260 miles range compared to 310 miles offered by other models, but it’s also the cheapest at $46,000.

Although Tesla didn’t specify Model 3 battery sizes, according to media reports, long-range model 3 is powered by a 75 kWh battery pack while the mid-range model uses a ~60 kWh battery pack.

To keep a check on cost Tesla did not software limit the 75 kWh battery packs and install them in the mid-range model. Instead, the company reduced the cells in the battery pack.

When asked for details about the mid-range battery, Elon Musk said ” It’s a long range battery with fewer cells. Non-cell portion of the pack is disproportionately high, but we can get it done now instead of ~February.

That’s why the mid-range and long-range models MPGe didn’t vary by a considerable margin,  27 kWh/100 miles vs 26 kWh/100 mi, a difference of 1 kWh per 100 miles driven.